Insignts

Canada

In case you didn’t make it this season – worry not!  The nature of the game will result in many applicants not getting an offer; top schools have low acceptance rates, suggesting that in any given year most people won’t get in. To hedge your bets, you have to be careful about the schools you select, apply to a few schools, and take into consideration your interests, professional goals and cultural fit while doing so. We work with many re-applicants every year, many of whom come to me at low stages, after they have received a reject, if not more.

For the most part, I can easily identify what went wrong with their applications, but sometimes, it is not as straightforward; even great candidates get rejected. This is no way an indication of your abilities, nor is it a failure.

But the brain can trick you into giving up. Because giving up will prevent you from the pain of dealing with rejection. This is the way our DNA has evolved over millennia – to cope with the situation, some may decide to move away from the goal.  But the only way to ensure success is to go on, to objectively and unemotionally work on the next steps. I tell all my clients that one has to be in the game to win the game.

I have divided my response in two parts, a) how do you cope with rejection, and b), what are your options.

Firstly, continue doing what you are doing. Do not quit your job in frustration hoping that you will regroup. It will not get better. It is important that you feel you are mastering something, even if it is not your chosen career path. Make sure you go to work and keep busy. Secondly, it is important to try to be ‘in flow.’ In case you are not getting enough punch at work, pick up a hobby and try to master it. Play a sport, join a club, develop a new professional skill, or maybe learn a new language. Thirdly, socialize. The easiest thing to do is to go into a cocoon in defeat. By doing so you will lose energy and feel even worse. In acting, there are two popular methods: without getting into details, one theory suggests that for an internal feeling to manifest, you have to drive it from outside. By enveloping yourself in gloomy environment, you will manifest that. Force yourself to go out and interact. A progressive and happy external environment will lead to the same feelings internally. In no time your mind will wander away from your burdens and you will feel renewed energy. Fourthly, give back. It is not the end of the world and there are people who need you. Tutor children, help the needy – whatever works with you. You will feel better.

Lastly, don’t blame yourself.  The more you believe you were responsible for the outcome, the more miserable you will be. Reality is that external factors played a role, just like they play everywhere in life. I have observed the workings of a top school’s admissions office for years. I assure you that the same application read on different days or by different people will lead to different outcomes. Just tell yourself that you did your best, and that circumstances beyond your control were not in your favor, and that you could have done nothing to change the current state.

In case you are looking to start in January, there are a number of great options: Columbia, INSEAD, HEC France, IE Spain, Ivey in Canada, and AGSM in Australia all have January intakes. In Canada, a number of Schools such as Queen’s Smith School and York’s Schulich offer Master’s programs that start in January or throughout the year. As an example, Queen’s runs its Masters of Management Analytics in January and May, and the Masters of Management in Artificial Intelligence in August. Specialized programs are a great alternative to the MBA, and can provide very fulfilling academic experiences and rewarding careers.

We have deep experience with all these schools. If you would like to learn more about them, of if you need help with your applications, please reach out.


DISCLAIMER: The views expressed on this site and in this article are opinions, and all data and information provided here are for informational purposes only. CollegeStation Eduservices LLP, its partners, clients or any of its associates make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information provided on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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The world has evolved over the last two decades, and today, the pace of change is faster than ever before. Sign onto Linkedin and look at jobs posted by multinationals and well-known firms, and you will observe, without any question, that ‘data,’ ‘digital’ and ‘technology’ are routine keywords on their descriptions.  In fact, in Canada, where I recently spent considerable time, rarely did I come across a job that didn’t require an understanding of technology and data. So much so that even traditional consulting and accounting firms now have specialized innovation hubs and AI practices. As examples, look at Accenture Innovation Hub and Deloitte Omnia AI.

The world is evolving, and over the last two decades, the pace of change is faster than ever before. Sign onto Linkedin and look at jobs posted by multinationals and well-known firms, and you will observe, without any question, that the keywords ‘data,’ ‘digital’ and ‘technology’ are routine on their descriptions.  In fact, in Canada, where I recently spent considerable time, rarely did I come across a job that didn’t require an understanding of technology and data. So much so that even traditional consulting and accounting firms now have specialized innovation hubs and AI practices. As examples, look at Accenture Innovation Hub and Deloitte Omnia AI.

As market needs are shifting, so are business schools. First, they are seeking the STEM designation for their MBA programs, such as at CMU’s Tepper and Michigan’s Ross, which now offer a STEM MBA curriculum, and second, they are offering specialized programs such as a Masters in Analytics. As examples, MIT Sloan, UCLA Anderson, UVA Darden, CMU Tepper, and LBS are few top schools that offer a degree in Analytics. Some of these programs are more difficult to get into than their respective school’s MBA programs!

Canada seems to have been ahead in this data revolution. U of Toronto’s Rotman School, Western’s Ivey School, Queen’s Smith School, British Columbia’s Sauder School, and York University’s Schulich School, all offer a Masters in Analytics. These programs are well regarded in the country. In fact, Queen’s University was also the first to start a Master of Management in Artificial Intelligence in Toronto. The program features a state-of-the-art blended curriculum, star faculty, weekly interaction with industry experts, company visits, and a capstone project, all very well managed by the School.

I have always advised my clients to (a) follow their interest, in case they know what they want, and (b) prepare for where the ball will be in the future. The MBA is here to stay, and the future is digital. Whether you get an MBA or a Masters, successful professionals will be at the forefront of data and AI. And if you opt for an MBA, you should, at the very least, expect to equip yourself with technical tools within your focus area, whether function or industry. For example, if you wish to study Marketing, plan to get deep knowledge in marketing analytics, and if you wish to study the entertainment industry, intend to get comfortable with technology trends in that space. All top MBA programs now offer a plethora of courses that will allow you to gain skills you need for your chosen space.

Ultimately, both degrees offer a path to corporate leadership. Once you join a company, other factors, both internal and external will play a role in your progression. What program to opt for will warrant a more detailed observation of individual profiles. Each candidate has a set of circumstances, and it is impractical to generalize with simple frameworks. With this article, I hope to provide you with some information to aid your decision-making.

 My recommendation is as follows – in case you are on the less experienced side, and prefer to fast track your career with a degree, a Masters in Analytics may very well be the way. Also, if you have an undergraduate degree in business or commerce, a degree in Analytics will add depth to your profile. For those who have technical backgrounds, such as in computer science or engineering, or for those who wish to seek broader industry exposure and keep options open, the MBA will likely be the degree of choice.

Then there are other programs. In case you have identified an area of interest, you could go for a specialized program, such as a degree in Supply Chain, Digital Product Management, Real Estate, Fashion Merchandising, Hospitality, or Finance. There are top-ranked programs in every space, and career opportunities post them are aplenty.

In case you need help with your Masters or MBA applications, please feel free to reach out to me.

The world has evolved over the last two decades, and today, the pace of change is faster than ever before. Sign onto Linkedin and look at jobs posted by multinationals and well-known firms, and you will observe, without any question, that ‘data,’ ‘digital’ and ‘technology’ are routine keywords on their descriptions.  In fact, in Canada, where I recently spent considerable time, rarely did I come across a job that didn’t require an understanding of technology and data. So much so that even traditional consulting and accounting firms now have specialized innovation hubs and AI practices. As examples, look at Accenture Innovation Hub and Deloitte Omnia AI.

As market needs are shifting, two things are happening in business schools. First, they are seeking the STEM designation for their MBA programs, such as at CMU’s Tepper and Michigan’s Ross, which now offer a STEM MBA curriculum, and second, they are offering a Masters program in Analytics. As examples, MIT Sloan, UCLA Anderson, UVA Darden, CMU Tepper, and LBS are few top schools that offer a degree in Analytics. Some of these programs are more difficult to get into than their respective school’s MBA programs!

Canada seems to have been ahead in this data revolution. U of Toronto’s Rotman School, Western’s Ivey School, Queen’s Smith School, British Columbia’s Sauder School, and York University’s Schulich School, all offer a Masters in Analytics. These programs are well regarded in the country. In fact, Queen’s University offers the only program of its kind, a Master of Management in Artificial Intelligence in Toronto. The program features a state-of-the-art blended curriculum, star faculty, weekly interaction with industry experts, company visits, and a capstone project, all very well managed by the School.

I have always advised my clients to (a) follow their interest, in case they know what they want, and (b) prepare for where the ball will be in the future. The MBA is here to stay, but the future is digital. Whether you get an MBA or a Masters, successful professionals will be at the forefront of data and AI. And if you opt for an MBA, you should, at the very least, expect to equip yourself with technical tools within your focus area, whether function or industry. For example, if you wish to study Marketing, plan to get knowledge in marketing analytics, and if you wish to study the entertainment industry, intend to get comfortable with technology trends in that space. All top MBA programs now offer a plethora of courses for you to gain skills you need for your chosen space.

Ultimately, both degrees offer a path to corporate leadership. Once you join a company, other factors, both internal and external will play a role in your progression. What program to opt for will warrant a more detailed observation of individual profiles. Each candidate has a set of circumstances, and it is impractical to generalize with a framework. With this article, I hope to provide you with some information to aid your decision-making.

 My recommendation is as follows – in case you are on the less experienced side, and prefer to fast track your career with a degree, a Masters in Analytics may very well be the way. Also, if you have an undergraduate degree in business or commerce, a degree in Analytics will add depth to your profile. For those who have technical backgrounds, such as in computer science or engineering, or for those who wish to seek broader industry exposure and keep options open, the MBA will likely be the degree of choice.

Then there are other programs. In case you have identified an area of interest, you could go for a specialized program, such as a degree in Supply Chain, Digital Product Management, Real Estate, Fashion Merchandising, Hospitality, or Finance. There are top-ranked programs in every space, and career opportunities post them are aplenty. In case you need help with your Masters or MBA applications, please reach out to me. 


DISCLAIMER: The views expressed on this site and in this article are opinions, and all data and information provided here are for informational purposes only. CollegeStation Eduservices LLP, its partners, clients or any of its associates make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information provided on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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After having lived in Canada this past year, I have had the opportunity to learn about its education system and interact with many business school graduates. University of Toronto’s Rotman School, Western University’s Ivey Business School, and Queens University’s Smith School of Business are generally considered the top schools. All of them are located in Ontario, and feature state-of-the-art campuses in downtown Toronto; Ivey and Smith have satellite campuses in which they run EMBA, Accelerated MBA and other executive and Masters programs. I have had the privilege of visiting the facilities of each one of these schools, which, by any global standard, are topnotch. Other well-reputed schools are McGill in Montreal, and University of British Columbia in Vancouver.

After having spent considerable time in Canada, I have had the opportunity to learn about its education system and interact with many business school graduates. University of Toronto’s Rotman School, Western University’s Ivey Business School, and Queens University’s Smith School of Business are generally considered the top schools. All of them are located in Ontario, and feature state-of-the-art campuses in downtown Toronto; Ivey and Smith have satellite campuses in which they run EMBA, Accelerated MBA and other executive and Masters programs. I have had the privilege of visiting the facilities of each one of these schools, which, by any global standards, are topnotch. Other well-reputed schools outside of Ontario are McGill in Montreal, and University of British Columbia in Vancouver.

With respect to the quality of education, curriculum and instruction, I was impressed with how responsive and current the Canadian system is. All Schools offer an array of specializations and concentrations, and boast star faculty, whose published books have made way into classrooms even at top American programs. The Schools also feature well-known research institutes and innovation hubs that are at the forefront of new-age thinking, such as AI. One such lab is the Creative Destruction Lab. Housed within the Rotman School, it is a dream workspace for budding entrepreneurs wishing to incubate and commercialize their ventures.

Location is definitely an advantage at many of these schools. Toronto is a fast growing commercial and tech hub. It is home to large multinationals, many startups, and the financial industry, all of which are a stone’s throw from these campuses. As examples, Rotman is within minutes of Mars Discovery District, the largest urban innovation center in the world, and Ivey’s downtown campus is located inside the Exchange Tower at Kings Street. It can’t get any better than this!

My goal from these articles is to answer the question in an unbiased way so that you can make the best decision for yourself, given your circumstances and future goals.  Lately, interest in Canada has risen, in part due to insecurity associated with post-MBA work authorization in the US, and relatively easier routes to Canadian residency. I hold a Diploma in Canadian Immigration and can well comprehend the attraction of a global and multicultural ticket.  A two-year program in Canada gives you a work-permit for three years, or in other words, makes you eligible for the Post Graduate Work Permit Program, which is a path towards residency. Further, any Master’s degree from Canada will give you additional points on your Express Entry application, making education a worthwhile endeavor if residency is your goal.

Having said that, in Canada, post-MBA salaries are lower, and the exchange rate is weaker. If you check placement reports of Canadian business schools, the average starting salaries are lower than those posted by their American counterparts; $80k to 90k Canadian is nowhere near $140+ American posted this year by some top US schools, especially if you take into account exchange rates. Reported Canadian salaries may also be slightly inflated because American companies, such as consulting firms and tech giants, pay higher than domestic companies to maintain parity across borders. Also, it is no surprise that in Canada, underemployment is high. Studies have also indicated that first generation immigrants face challenges, and make lower than local residents, although in the long run these gaps taper; I have interacted with many immigrant professionals making upwards of 300k.

So should you get an MBA in Canada? Absolutely! We have worked with many candidates who are now in business school, or settled in Canada, and all of them are very satisfied with their decision. Many of them have made it to multinationals and other top companies, which would not have been possible without a top academic program. I continue to maintain that education is the best route to the Canadian dream as time spent in University gives you exposure to the market and helps build important connections, both important for your job search.  Given the effects of Globalization, and Canada’s growing position, this may very well be the right time for a Canadian degree. In a few years, as Canadian firms make way into the rest of the world, the stamp’s brand equity is likely to be comparable to that of top American schools.

For now, in case you weigh the possibility of residency and a great education over short-term salaries, consider Canada. On the other hand if you want a stamp from a top global brand, one you can flash today anywhere in the world, consider the US or Europe (I would argue that all top schools provide a great academic experience, and a multicultural environment).

Please feel free to reach out to me in case you have any questions.

After having lived in Canada this past year, I have had the opportunity to learn about its education system and interact with many business school graduates. University of Toronto’s Rotman School, Western University’s Ivey Business School, and Queens University’s Smith School of Business are generally considered the top schools. All of them are located in Ontario, and feature state-of-the-art campuses in downtown Toronto; Ivey and Smith have satellite campuses in which they run EMBA, Accelerated MBA and other executive and Masters programs. I have had the privilege of visiting the facilities of each one of these schools, which, by any global standard, are topnotch. Other well-reputed schools are McGill in Montreal, and University of British Columbia in Vancouver.

With respect to the quality of education, curriculum and instruction, I was impressed with how responsive and current the Canadian system is. All Schools offer an array of specializations and concentrations, and boast star faculty, whose published books have made their way into classrooms at top US Schools. The Schools also feature well-known research institutes and innovation hubs that are at the forefront of new technologies, such as AI. One such lab is the Creative Destruction Lab. Housed within the Rotman School, it is a dream workspace for budding entrepreneurs who wish to incubate and commercialize their ventures.

Location is definitely an advantage at many of these schools. Toronto is one of the fastest growing cities in North America; it is home to large multinationals, successful startups, and the financial industry, all of which are a stone’s throw from these campuses. As examples, Rotman is within minutes of Mars Discovery District, the largest urban innovation center in the world, and Ivey’s downtown campus is located inside the Exchange Tower at Kings Street. It can’t get any better than this!

My goal from these articles is to answer the question in an unbiased way so that you can make the best decision for yourself, given your circumstances and future goals.  Lately, interest in Canada has risen, in part due to insecurity associated with post-MBA work authorization in the US, and relatively easier routes to Canadian residency. I hold a Diploma in Canadian Immigration and can well comprehend the attraction of a global and multicultural ticket.  A two-year program in Canada gives you a work-permit for three years, or in other words, makes you eligible for the Post Graduate Work Permit Program, which is a path towards residency. Further, any Master’s degree from Canada will give you additional points on your Express Entry application, making education a worthwhile endeavor if residency is your goal.

Having said that, in Canada, post-MBA salaries are lower, and the exchange rate is weaker. If you check placement reports of Canadian business schools, the average starting salaries are lower than those posted by their American counterparts; $80k to 90k Canadian is nowhere near $140+ American posted this year by some top US schools, especially if you take into account exchange rates. Reported Canadian salaries may also be inflated because American companies, such as consulting firms and tech giants, pay higher than domestic companies to maintain parity across borders. It is no surprise that in Canada, underemployment is high and white-collar jobs do not pay as much. Studies have also indicated that first generation immigrants face challenges, and make lower than local residents. Although in the long run, these gaps narrow. I have interacted with many immigrant professionals making upwards of 300k. So should you get an MBA in Canada? We have worked with many candidates who are now in business school, or settled in Canada, and all of them are very satisfied with their decision. I continue to maintain that education is the best route to the Canadian dream as time spent in University gives you exposure to the market and helps build important connections, both important for your job search. In case you weigh the possibility of residency and a great education over short-term salaries, consider Canada. On the other hand if you want a stamp from a top global brand, one you can flash anywhere in the world, consider the US or Europe (I would argue that all top schools provide a great academic experience, and a multicultural environment).    


DISCLAIMER: The views expressed on this site and in this article are opinions, and all data and information provided here are for informational purposes only. CollegeStation Eduservices LLP, its partners, clients or any of its associates make no representations as to accuracy, completeness, currentness, suitability, or validity of any information provided on this site and will not be liable for any errors, omissions, delays in this information or any losses, injuries, or damages arising from its display or use. All information is provided on an as-is basis.

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